SARDINIA 2019

17th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, 30 September - 4 October 2019, Santa Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy. Website

IWWG Russia and NIS Regional Branch: International Scientific Conference

The IWWG Regional Branch for Russia and NIS is co-organizing the IV International Scientific Conference "From Waste Management to Resource Recovery" to be held 5-6 Dec. 2019 in Perm, Russia.

* IWWG co-sponsored events







IWWG Specialized workshops

The outcome of the scientific work within the IWWG task groups is communicated and disseminated by multiple means. Traditionally, the groups take advantage of the international conferences scientifically organized or co-sponsored by the IWWG in order to discuss their results and ongoing research in the framework of specialized workshops. In 2015, a number of specialized workshops have been organized during the 15th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium - Sardinia 2015.


AFTERCARE COMPLETION DECISION MAKING

H. SCHARFF - IWWG Task group on Sustainable Landfill Management

Heijo Scharff

Aftercare completion is the moment at which a landfill site can be considered functionally stable, thus entering post-regulatory minimal care. From that moment, the remaining risk and emission potential is transferred from the landfill operator to the society.
The main issue is represented by the difficulty to use available data to predict stability of waste in the landfill body after completion, due to changes (e.g. build-up of a leachate table in the site) which may invalidate models used.
The workshop will consist of short and focused presentations, aimed to better understand the role of assessment of long-term emissions, including data needed and criteria to be used for a further development in completion procedures.


BIOLOGICAL HYROGEN PRODUCTION

A. MUNTONI and L. ALIBARDI - IWWG Task Group Hydrogen Production

Aldo Muntoni

The workshops will address the most recent and relevant novelties in the field of Hydrogen Production from biomass and waste, focusing in particular on the integration of the biological process with other treatment options and on the real possibilities and current challenges for scaling-up the process and its full application. 


LESSONS LEARNED FROM LANDFILL AERATION PROJECTS – WHAT ARE THE MAIN CRITERIA FOR SUCCESSFUL APPROACHES?

M. RITZKOWSKI - IWWG Task Group on Landfill Aeration

Marco Ritzkowski

Landfill aeration is one of the most important techniques for promoting sustainable bio-stabilisation of MSW landfills. However, results coming from different aeration projects are not always concordant.
The workshop will consist of some brief presentations, followed by interactive group discussion in order to identify similarities and discrepancies between landfill aeration projects.


INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT: NEW OPPORTUNITIES

E. GIDARAKOS - IWWG Task Group on Industrial Waste Management

Evangelos Gidarakos

Industrial waste production is significantly larger than Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) production. In some cases, they can contain and release pollutants that are potentially harmful to the environment and population so they are considered to be hazardous waste. In the past, the inadequate management and disposal of such waste has caused severe environmental impacts, and continues to be so today in some cases (particularly in developing countries).
Over time, industrial waste has come to be viewed as a potential source for industry, and now it has been included in the concept of urban mining: also industrial residues should be minimized, reused and recycled before handling and treatment prior to final disposal.


MODERN METHODS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT EDUCATION AND TRAINING

I.D. WILLIAMS - IWWG Task Group on Education in Waste Management

I.D. Williams

The need to reduce the negative impacts of waste treatment and disposal and to use resources more efficiently will require dynamic changes within the sector. This will result in further changes to the composition of the workforce and different training and education will be required.
The first half of the workshop, led by Simon Kemp, will deal with “The use of social media and student engagement to deliver waste management education and training”: delegates will learn how to develop learning activities using social media and active engagement with learners.
The second half, led by Peter Shaw and Ian Williams, will deal with “Working with local authorities to deliver waste management education and training”. Delegates will be involved in an interactive session that will tease out the practical implications, impacts, advantages and disadvantages of collaborative working from an educational and local authority point of view.


METHANE OXIDATION SYSTEMS – CAN NATURAL ANALOGIES BE USED FOR LONG-TERM EVALUATION?

M. HUBER-HUMER and J. GEBERT - IWWG Task Group on Landfill Gas Emission and Mitigation

Marion Huber-Humer

Microbial methane oxidation in landfill covers was an important research topic during the past years, and is still matter of research. Some approaches are available to predict long-term performances and to evaluate the effectiveness of the solutions, but approved models as well as acceptable residual emission values are still needed to be developed.The aim of this workshop is to discuss the possibility to compare engineered (e.g. landfills) and natural oxidation systems (e.g. oxidation processes occurring in the upper aerated layers of wetlands or peat borgs). Starting from analysis of emission and oxidation data referred to natural systems, the discussion will deal with the possibility to transfer these information to “anthropogenic habitat” in order to derive values for acceptable emissions.


ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS IN WASTE STREAMS

F. PART and M. HUBER-HUMER - IWWG Task Group on Engineered Nanomaterials in Waste

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are currently used in over 1,600 consumer products. As these ENM-laden materials and/or products reach the end of their useful life, the development of appropriate end-of-life management strategies to manage the ENMs is critical to minimize human and/or environment exposure. Currently, there are significant knowledge and data gaps associated with the fate of these embedded ENMs in waste management processes, limiting our ability to develop appropriate end-of-life strategies. This workshop will consist of presentations and discussions related to ENM fate in waste management processes, as well as the identification of research needs and challenges.


URBAN MINING AND LANDFILL MINING

J. LEDERER and J. FELNNER - Vienna University of Technology

The workshop intends to bring together researchers in the fields of so-called urban mining and landfill mining. Selected presentations as well as a group discussion among workshop participants will focus on

  • definitions and concepts of urban mining and landfill mining
  • methods for the exploration and prospection of anthropogenic material flows and stocks for urban mining and landfill mining
  • evaluation of anthropogenic material flows and stocks for urban mining and landfill mining

The expected outcome of the workshop is the definition of one (urban and landfill mining) or two (urban mining, landfill mining) task groups potentially to be installed in the International Waste Working Group (IWWG).


FROM WASTE TO ART FROM ART TO WASTE

R. STEGMANN (IWWG Managing Board) and C. v.d. WESTHUYZEN (IWWG Southern Africa Regional Branch)

Rainer Stegmann

The practice of making art from waste and unusual material is widely spread. This is in response to the need for artists, designers and academic institutions to engage with new forms of creativity but also to be part of a move towards waste reduction awareness.

Why is this significant to waste experts?

The utilization of waste materials in art does not necessarily result in a substantial increase in recycling or in the reduction of waste but it can change the way in which waste is perceived. Bringing waste back to people in an attractive form can challenge the thinking of the waste experts and awaken an interest in those unaware of waste management problems.