Lectures FOOD for BRAIN

The International Waste Working Group is organizing a series of monthly online keynote lectures on hot topics of waste management - free accessible.

Selected, highly respected and acclaimed experts will present the current status on their field of expertise; people who have been at the first line, with different backgrounds and positions, have valuable knowledge and experience that it is really worth sharing and spreading, providing food for brain.


 

WHAT DOES WASTE MANAGEMENT HAVE TO DO WITH PLANETARY BOUNDARIES?

Rainer Stegmann, Hamburg University of Technology, Germany

Rockström developed with a group of distinguished scientists the Planetary Boundaries (PBs) as a guideline for humanity striving for sustainability. If we expand the waste
term to include all liquid, gaseous and solid residues from production and human activities then waste is the cause for the environmental destruction on our globe.
Plastic in the ocean, climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater use, over fertilising etc. are the result of poor waste management. read more

To download the presentation and to view the recorded lecture please login to the Members Area (IWWG membership required).


GLOBAL TREND AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES ON PLASTIC WASTE MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY IN KOREA

Seung-Whee Rhee, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Republic of Korea

Plastics have brought a great convenience to our lives due to its high functionality and flexibility. In 2015, the amount of global plastic produced is 407 million tons, and it is expected to increase to 1,600 million tons by 2050. The increasing plastic waste have become urgent environmental issues such as resource and waste problems, marine plastic litter issues, and climate change. There are many international movements to overcome these issues. read more

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ROLE OF LANDFILLING IN CIRCULAR ECONOMY STRATEGIES

Raffaello Cossu, University of Padova, Italy

The passage from a linear to a circular approach is characterizing the modern waste management strategies. The circular approach primarily arises from a growing need for primary raw material, as a consequence of global economic development Attention is shifting from the limited and fixed stocks of raw materials to the increasing anthropogenic stocks of materials This creates the base for the development of different strategies for recovering of resources from waste (urban mining, circular economy, etc.). read more


A NEW PERSPECTIVE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION IN WASTE MANAGEMENT

Giovanni de Feo, University of Salerno, Italy

It is commonly assumed that there is no age limit to change mindset and behaviour. However, children and youth can easily pick up and understand environmental issues and can be
encouraged to act as agents of change for promoting and enabling change to happen within their extended family. read more

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EMERGING POLLUTANTS OF CONCERN IN THE LEACHATE FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

Pinjing He, Tongji University, PR of China

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is predominantly disposed by landfill and incineration all over the world. MSW composition is complex and tends to be complicated with the
socioeconomic development.
MSW is commonly regarded as a sink of various emerging pollutants related with anthropic activities. Thus, leachate from MSW shall be a source of these emerging pollutants derived
from landfills and waste-to-energy plants. read more

To download the presentation and to view the recorded lecture please login to the Members Area (IWWG membership required).


HOW TO DETERMINE WHETHER A BIOPLASTIC IS TRULY BIODEGRADABLE?

William Clarke, University of Queensland, Australia

Approximately 10 million tonnes of plastics flow to the ocean each year. A range of measures to avoid plastic pollution include bans on plastic items, producer responsibility schemes and penalties for littering.
Another measure is the substitution of bioplastics into household consumer items. read more

To download the presentation and to view the recorded lecture please login to the Members Area (IWWG membership required).


ARE LANDFILL EMISSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES UNDERSTATED?

Susan Thorneloe, Environmental Protection Agency, USA

Recent measurements from next generation emission measurement (technology indicate that methane emissions from U S landfills may be understated Remote sensing studies in California revealed that landfills were responsible for 41 of the State’s methane inventory, with 32 super emitting landfills identified.
A 2020 USEPA report concluded that air rules are being inconsistently implemented and enforced. read more

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THERMOCHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR ENERGY OR FUEL RECOVERY FROM WASTE

Umberto Arena, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Italy

Thermochemical treatments of different kinds of solid waste are today able to provide a safe recovery of electric and thermal energy, an efficient recycling of
inorganic materials and a crucial saving of space for landfilling, in full compliance with the protection of human health and the environment. read more

To download the presentation and to view the recorded lecture please login to the Members Area (IWWG membership required).


THE SPACE DEBRIS ENVIRONMENT

Carsten Wiedemann, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany

At low earth orbits (LEO) particularly high collision velocities can occur. The potential risk of space debris is associated with the high kinetic energy that can occur during a
collision. The collision velocities on LEO are in the order of ten kilometres per second. A risk for active spacecraft exists from a particle diameter of about one millimeter. Above
this size, a satellite structure can be seriously damaged. read more

To download the presentation and to view the recorded lecture please login to the Members Area (IWWG membership required).