Wissenschaftliches Kolloquium

Prof. Dr. Arne Jacob gives a presentation on

Data Stream Processing in Wireless Networks

on March 8th, 2017 at 15.30 PM in room N.0010.

 

Abstract:

One remedy to satisfy the ever increasing need for bandwidth is to move communication systems to higher operating frequencies. Besides the challenges imposed by the decreasing wavelength and the associated miniaturization, various other design constraints may apply depending on the application. This has a strong impact on component and subsystem packaging. In this presentation, three examples are considered which illustrate possible approaches. The first one deals with a 2.5D circuit integration in LTCC (Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics) for satellite applications and with the on-orbit verification of the concept. The second example reports a package design for solid-state power amplifiers to be used in active multi-beam satellite antennas. At last, a low-cost packaging approach for 100 Gbps communication systems is sketched.

Short Bio of the speaker:

  • 1979 Dipl.-Ing. degree in Electrical Engineering, High-Frequency Technology, TU Braunschweig
  • 1986 Dr.-Ing. degree, TU Braunschweig
  • 1986 - 1988 "Fellow", RF Group, Super Proton Synchrotron, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • 1988 - 1990 Staff Scientist, Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA/USA
  • 1990 - 2004 Professor of Microwave Engineering, TU Braunschweig
  • 2004 - now Professor of High-Frequency Technology, Hamburg University of Technology

All interested people are kindly invited.


Prof. Dr. Volker Turau gives a presentation on

Data Stream Processing in Wireless Networks

on March 8th, 2017 at 15.30 PM in room N.0010.

 

Abstract:

A data stream is a sequence of digitally encoded signals that represent continuously recorded information from a particular location. Embedded into the physical world, wireless sensor networks can aggregate such data streams from different locations into a single stream. Monitoring and analyzing large and rapidly changing streams of data that arrive online in an environment with with bounded resources (bandwidth, memory, etc.) is a challenging task. The unbounded length of a data stream makes it impossible to store the entire contents of the stream, yet many applications demand to retain some ability to execute queries referencing past data. The talk considers the problem of maintaining statistics over streams with regard to all or the last n data elements seen so far.

Short Bio of the speaker:

  • Academic studies at University of Mainz
  • Diploma degree in mathematics in 1984
  • PhD degree in mathematics in 1987 (subject: algebraic groups)
  • Postdoc positions in Manchester, Karlsruhe and Berkeley
  • Member of TUHH since September 2002

All interested people are kindly invited.