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2008
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German Research Foundation (DFG)
Priority Programme (SPP 1077)

Socionics

"Socionics" is the designation of an interdisciplinary research framework which combines Sociology and Computer Sciences (especially Distributed Artificial Intelligence). The objective is to develop intelligent computer technologies by picking up paradigms of our social world and to use computer technology in order to verify and to develop sociological models of societies and organizations. Five projects are cooperating in a tandem-structure with at least one partner from Sociology and one from Computer Science forming a virtual research unit. Work in Socionics demands from sociologists to precisely specify the conceptual apparatus with which they observe and explain the unique features of human society (flexibility, combined with ultra-robustness). From computer scientists, it demands that they design large-scale systems, which are in the end non-deterministic. To both, it offers a fascinating potential to stimulate interdisciplinary research and to develop innovative applications. Research in Socionics claims to address three aspects of computational social intelligence: (1) It strives to develop new techniques and methods in DAI by sociologically enhancing the construction of large-scale multiagent systems beyond the scope of contemporary approaches. The reference here is clearly "computational". (2) The use of computer models in sociological theorizing marks the "sociological reference", claiming to gain new perspectives on classical problems of sociology, as well as new methodologies to reason about them (e.g. agent-based social simulation). (3) Finally, since they are directly involved in the development of new technologies with a "praxis reference", researchers in Socionics also gain deep insights into hybrid artificial societies, in which human beings and technical agents interact on the same level.

Final Reports

Klaus Fischer, Michael Florian, and Thomas Malsch (Eds.): Socionics: Its Contributions to the Scalability of Complex Social Systems. Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence LNAI 2934. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer-Verlag, 2005

Klaus Fischer and Michael Florian: Contribution of Socionics to the Scalability of Complex Social Systems: Introduction. In: Klaus Fischer, Michael Florian, and Thomas Malsch (Eds.): Socionics: Its Contributions to the Scalability of Complex Social Systems. Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence LNAI 2934. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer-Verlag, 2005, pp. 1-14

Marco Schmitt, Michael Florian und Frank Hillebrandt (Hg.): Reflexive soziale Mechanismen. Von soziologischen Erklärungen zu sozionischen Modellen. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2006.

Marco Schmitt: Einführung: Die Reflexivität sozialer Mechanismen. In: Marco Schmitt, Michael Florian und Frank Hillebrandt (Hg.): Reflexive soziale Mechanismen. Von soziologischen Erklärungen zu sozionischen Modellen. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2006, S. 7-27


"Special Section: Socionics" in: "Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation (JASSS)", Volume 10, Issue 1,  January 2007
<http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/1/contents.html>

Thomas Malsch and Ingo Schulz-Schaeffer (2007): Socionics: Sociological Concepts for Social Systems of Artificial (and Human) Agents. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation vol. 10, no. 1
<http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/1/11.html>

Michael Florian und Thomas Malsch: DFG-SCHWERPUNKTPROGRAMM 1077 Sozionik: Erforschung und Modellierung künstlicher Sozialität. Programmspezifischer Abschlussbericht des Schwerpunktprogramms "Sozionik" (SPP 1077). Hamburg, November 2008
<http://www.tu-harburg.de/tbg/Deutsch/SPP/Abschlussbericht_SPP1077_Sozionik.pdf>

Responsible for this website is Marco Schmitt.



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