Dr.-Ing. Florian Griese

Technische Universität Hamburg (TUHH)
Institut für Biomedizinische Bildgebung
Gebäude E, Raum 4.044
Am Schwarzenberg-Campus 3
21073 Hamburg

E-Mail: florian.griese@tuhh.de

Research Interests

  • Magnetic Particle Imaging
  • Signal- and Image Processing
  • Image Registration
  • Parallel Force and Imaging MPI Application
  • Spectral-MPI for Interventional Application

Curriculum Vitae

Florian Griese studied Medical Engineering Science at the University of Lübeck between 2007 and 2012. He received his master's degree in medical engineering science from the University of Lübeck in 2012 on X-Space Reconstruction with Lissajous Trajectories in Magnetic Particle Imaging. Between 2013 and 2016 he worked as a software developer at EUROIMMUN in the field of automation development.
Currently, he is a PhD student in the group of Tobias Knopp for experimental Biomedical Imaging at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and the Hamburg University of Technology.

Publications

[120378]
Title: Determining Perfusion Parameters using Magnetic Particle Imaging: A Phantom Study using a Human-Sized Flow Phantom. <em>9th International Workshop on Magnetic Particle Imaging (IWMPI 2019)</em>
Written by: N. Gdaniec, M. Graeser, F. Thieben, P Szwargulski, F. Werner, M. Boberg, F. Griese, M. Möddel, P. Ludewig, D. van de Ven, O. M. Weber, O. Woywode, B. Gleich, and T. Knopp
in: (2019).
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on pages: 151-152
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Note: inproceedings, brainimager

Abstract: The determination of brain perfusion is an important issue for the diagnosis and treatment of vascular diseases. We designed a human-sized dynamic flow phantom mimicking the perfusion properties of the brain and used the human-sized MPI head scanner to acquire data from dynamic bolus injection experiments. A stroke was simulated by occluding one of the feeding hoses. We derived perfusion parameter maps from these data and were able to detect the simulated stroke.